The Facts

 

As of 2015, there have been well-over a million veterans who have sustained nonfatal injuries in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many veterans returning from combat have visible injuries, including head injuries and severe injuries to their extremities, but some are suffering invisible injuries; traumatic brain injuries, related neurological problems, PTS, hearing and respiratory problems. Often, it is the injuries that go untreated or are not treated effectively, that result in a high rate of isolation, joblessness, and suicide among returning veterans. 

Canine companions who are trained in disability specific tasks can help deter the overwhelming physical and emotional issues that are associated with returning combat veterans. Experience and studies have shown that service dogs provide significant benefits to wounded veterans by performing tasks that give a veteran the ability to live independently, a sense of security resulting in fewer anxiety events and less medication.